Tagged: Comedy

South Park & Noam Chomsky on 9/11 Conspiracies

South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker are far from leftists. They probably coincide more with political libertarianism, agorism or Austrian economics than any other ideologies (although I’m sure they don’t wish to be forced into any label). Nevertheless, on many occasions their ideas and beliefs, as they communicate them through their comedy, coincide with many ideas usually associated with the left. Their show, although it may sound unlikely to many, has tremendous potential as an instrument of political agitation and even education. We will occasionaly share some episodes that exemplify this potential. It’s always good to sometimes think, analyze, or reflect on subjects while laughing out loud.

Read Noam Chomsky’s views on 9/11 conspiracies and then watch South Park: Mystery of the Urinal Deuce. Very similar ideas!

From Wikipedia:

Chomsky’s Views on 9/11 conspiracy theories

Chomsky has dismissed 9/11 conspiracy theories, stating that there is no credible evidence to support the claim that the United States government was responsible for the attacks.

I think the Bush administration would have had to be utterly insane to try anything like what is alleged, for their own narrow interests, and do not think that serious evidence has been provided to support claims about actions that would not only be outlandish, for their own interests, but that have no remote historical parallel.

In addition, Chomsky said he would not be surprised if the conspiracy theory movement is being fueled by the government establishment to distract the public from more pressing matters.

People always ask, “What can I do?” And then they say, here’s something I can do. I can become a qualified civil engineer in an hour, and prove that Bush blew up the World Trade Center. I’m pretty sure that in Washington they must be clapping. A couple of years ago, I came across a Pentagon document that was about declassification procedures. Among other things, it proposed that the government should periodically declassify information about the Kennedy assassination. Let people trace whether Kennedy was killed by the mafia, so activists will go off on a wild goose chase instead of pursuing real problems or getting organized. It wouldn’t shock me if thirty years from now we discover in the declassified record that the 9/11 [conspiracy] industry was also being fed by the [Bush] administration.

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South Park and Immigration: Reserve Army of Labor and Unequal Development

South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker are far from leftists. They probably coincide more with political libertarianism, agorism or Austrian economics than any other ideologies (although I’m sure they don’t wish to be forced into any label). Nevertheless, on many occasions their ideas and beliefs, as they communicate them through their comedy, coincide with many ideas usually associated with the left. Their show, although it may sound unlikely to many, has tremendous potential as an instrument of political agitation and even education. We will occasionaly share some episodes that exemplify this potential. It’s always good to sometimes think, analyze, or reflect on subjects while laughing out loud. 

In this episode, Stone and Parker create an analogy for the issues revolving around the immigration of many Latin Americans into the US. In the episode, people from future America come back to the past looking for jobs. They are willing to work for less, taking jobs away from present day Americans. The boys take on a racist (actually “timecist” because it’s discriminating toward other time people) and conservative position because they lost their jobs as well. Eventually, they recognize their wrong doings; and realize that the issue is helping the future get better. In other words, the issue is, as the “liberal aging hippie douche” says in the episode, that multinational corporations impoverish Latin American countries, creating the need for their workers to seek better jobs elsewhere. If US workers want to stop the immigration of cheaper labor, they should fight against the impoverishment of Third World countries by the hands of global capitalism (i.e, fight for world socialism!). The episode is also handy to visualize the concept of the reserve army of labor. Unemployment incentives people to work for less, lowering average wages. In other words, unemployment sometimes can actually help capitalists.

Watch South Park Episode 6 from Season 8.

The Republican-Democrat Heist: South Park and US elections

South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker are far from leftists. They probably coincide more with political libertarianism, agorism or Austrian economics than any other ideologies (although I’m sure they don’t wish to be forced into any label). Nevertheless, on many occasions their ideas and beliefs, as they communicate them through their comedy, coincide with many ideas usually associated with the left. Their show, although it may sound unlikely to many, has tremendous potential as an instrument of political agitation and even education. We will occasionaly share some episodes that exemplify this potential. It’s always good to sometimes think, analyze, or reflect on subjects while laughing out loud. 

 

Obama and McCain team up? For an Ocean’s 11 type heist? Watch “About Last Night” free at the Official South Park Website

 

I’m not sure if Stone and Parker intended the episode “About last Night” to be a critique of US politics or they simply wanted to make a funny story, but maybe it unintentionally makes a good and humorous analogy of what US elections are all about. The electoral race is nothing but a big distraction, that ultimately perpetuates political power (or the Hope Diamond according to South Park) in the few hands of politicians. No matter who wins, they take all.

South Park analogy aside, even the Democratic Parties’ machinery is too intertwined with American capitalism to have the potential of being an agent of change. Our only hope is to construct power from below, empowering communities and workers through institutions such as Worker enterprises and Communal Cooperatives; while constructing simultaneously a radical political organization that can truly challenge the status quo.

God is bi-curious: South Park and homosexuality

South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker are far from leftists. They probably coincide more with political libertarianism, agorism or Austrian economics than any other ideologies (although I’m sure they don’t wish to be forced into any label). Nevertheless, on many occasions their ideas and beliefs, as they communicate them through their comedy, coincide with many ideas usually associated with the left. Their show, although it may sound unlikely to many, has tremendous potential as an instrument of political agitation and even education. We will occasionaly share some episodes that exemplify this potential. It’s always good to sometimes think, analyze, or reflect on subjects while laughing out loud. 

In the episode “Cartman Sucks,” a misunderstanding lands Butters in a “Pray away the gay Camp.” Listen to what Butters has to say to the Christian camp leaders who continue to harass young boys because they are “confused.”

“My name’s Butters. I’m eight years old, blood type O, and I’m bi-curious. And even that’s okay. Because if I’m bi-curious, and I’m somehow made from God, then I guess God must be a little bi-curious himself!”

Watch South Park Episode Cartman Sucks free from the Official South Park Website